The port of Nagasaki resembles an amphitheater looking out to the sea. Nagasaki Prefecture Convention and Tourism Association

5 things to do in Nagasaki City
Patricia Lourdes Viray (philstar.com) - January 5, 2018 - 11:19am

NAGASAKI, Japan – The city of Nagasaki in Japan’s Kyushu Island was the country’s window to the rest of the world as it was the only port open during the national isolation from 1641 to 1858.

Up to the present, the port city reflects a mixture of Japanese, European and Chinese influences as an indirect effect of the policy.

Below is a list of activities for those who would like to visit the city on the southern island of Kyushu.

Wear a kimono

One of the world’s instantly recognizable traditional attire, the Japanese kimono is worn by women on particularly special occasions. Tourists visiting Nagasaki can experience wearing the traditional Japanese garment upon entering Dejima, which used to be a trading post for the Dutch East India Company.

Built in 1636, the 15,000 square artificial island called Dejima was built at the tip of the cape of Nagasaki to isolate foreigners from local Japanese residents and prevent the spread of Christianity.

 

Visitors can rent a kimono at Dejima in Nagasaki City. Nagasaki Prefecture Convention and Tourism Association

Visit Glover Garden

Known as the father of Japanese beer, Thomas Blake Glover first came to Nagasaki in 1859 and later on established the Glover Trading Company in Nagasaki. He has contributed to the modernization of Japan through shipbuilding, coal mining and tea trade. He built a house on the hill in Minami-Yamate, which is now called “Glover Garden.”

The Glover Garden, situated beside the Oura Church in Nagasaki, includes the homes of merchants who lived in Nagasaki, a retro photography studio where visitors can rent retro clothes, a coffee shop and a souvenir shop.

 

A pavilion at Glover Garden in Nagasaki 

 

Glover Garden is a popular tourist spot in Nagasaki City. Patricia Lourdes Viray

Learn its history

Bearing the brunt of the attack of the US upon nearing the end of World War II, Nagasaki City plays an important part of Japanese history. After dropping a nuclear weapon on Hiroshima, the US dropped an atomic bomb on Nagasaki, totally devastating the city.

A monolith stands at the hypocenter of the atomic bomb, which is also a part of the Nagasaki Peace Park. In the vicinity of the park is the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum, which is a popular destination for Japanese students having their field trip.                                                                                                                

RELATED: Nagasaki: A picture of resilience

Photos of the aftermath of the 1945 atomic bomb attack are exhibited at the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum. Patricia Lourdes Viray

 

Photos of the aftermath of the 1945 atomic bomb attack are exhibited at the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum. Patricia Lourdes Viray

Enjoy the night view

Along with Hong Kong and Monaco, Nagasaki has been dubbed as one of the three cities with the best night views in the world. The best way to enjoy the city’s night view is through the Mount Inasa Park in the Inasa mountain range, which rises 333 meters above sea level.

The port of Nagasaki can be seen at the center while mountains loom on three sides. Lights from homes and the city add spectacle to the site, along with stars twinkling in the night sky.

 

The port of Nagasaki can be seen from the top of Mt. Inasa. Nagasaki Prefecture Convention and Tourism Association

Nagasaki City has one of the best night views in the world. Nagasaki Prefecture Convention and Tourism Association

Pay homage to Christian saints

Nagasaki City is also home to churches and related sites reflecting Japanese Christian’s strong faith despite going underground for 250 years. One of the famous Christian sites in the city is the 26 Martyrs site on Nishizaka Hill where St. Paul Miki and his companions were crucified in 1597. This is also the site where St. Lorenzo Ruiz, the first Filipino martyr and saint, and his companions died.

At the back of the 26 Martyrs of Japan monument is a museum where visitors can learn the history of Christianity in Nagasaki.

 

A replica of the 26 Martyrs Monument is displayed at the 26 Martyrs Museum. Patricia Lourdes Viray

 

A statue of St. Lorenzo Ruiz can be seen inside the Nakamachi Church in Nagasaki. Patricia Lourdes Viray


RELATED: Nagasaki: A Christian pilgrim destination

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Editor's note: The tour to Nagasaki was hosted by Japan Discovery and Media International, in partnership with Nagasaki Prefecture Convention and Tourism Association, to promote tourism in the area. At no stage does the host organization have a say on the stories generated from the coverage, interviews conducted, publication date and story treatment. Content is produced solely by Philstar.comfollowing editorial guidelines.

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