Celebrating Eid al-Fitr around the table
Alixandra Caole Vila (The Philippine Star) - July 29, 2014 - 1:26pm

MANILA, Philippines - Celebrated July 29, 2014 in the Philippines is the Muslim festival of Eid al-Fitr (breaking of the fast), which marks the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan and the beginning of the month Shawwal, the tenth month of their lunar Islamic calendar.

In the Philippines, Eid al-Fitr is also known as "Wakas ng Ramadan" and "Pagtatapos ng Pag-aayuno."

It is recognized by the Philippine government as a regular holiday. The first commemoration of this holiday occurred on Dec. 6, 2002. The Philippines is not the only country celebrating this feast. All over the world, Muslims celebrate this by offering prayers on their mosques and sharing traditional food as a thanksgiving to their God for allowing them to abide by their religious duties and to uphold peace and unity among Islam's faithful.

Although with similar goals, purposes, and general rituals, celebration from different countries still have some variations, especially when it comes to food being served.

Let us take a look on how some of the countries celebrate theirs through food:

Asia
In Malaysia, there are two special delicacies served during Hari Raya Aidilfitri. These are the ketupat in which the rice is cooked in a packet woven from coconut leaves and the lemang or the glutinous rice cooked with coconut milk in bamboo stems. Both dishes are served with rendang, meat cooked with spices and coconut milk until almost dry.

Pakistanis and Bangladeshis celebrate this with a comforting bowl of seviyan kheer, which combines roasted ermicelli with condensed milk, cardamom, pistachios, saffron, and ghee.

Middle East

Generosity and hospitality are shown throughout the celebration. It is  a tradition for the men in Saudi to leave rice and other staples at the doorsteps of the less fortunate.

In Syria, Lebanon, Palestine and Jordan, maamoul is always present at Eid. These are shortbread cookies made with semolina flour and rosewater, stuffed with dates and pistachios, molded into little balls, and dusted off with icing sugar.

Africa

In Tunisia, special biscuits including Baklava, a rich, sweet pastry made of layers of filo filled with chopped nuts and sweetened and held together with syrup or honey and Ka'ak cookies are shared to friends and relatives.

Meloui completes the table in Morocco. These are pancakes  made with semolina flour, butter, and sugar, which are rolled like a mini carpet.

Europe
In Southeastern part of Europe, Eid al-Fitr is often called Seker Bayram, or the sugar festival. Phyllo pastry delicacies, which come in all shapes, sizes and varieties are served. Usually involved are thin layers of dough combined with nuts, which are then slathered in honey syrup mixed with rosewater or orange blossom water.

CELEBRATED JULY EID FITR HARI RAYA AIDILFITRI IN MALAYSIA IN SOUTHEASTERN IN SYRIA IN THE PHILIPPINES IN TUNISIA MIDDLE EAST
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