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Andal Jr., Zaldy to take convictions to CA
Instead of filing a motion for reconsideration, the Ampatuan brothers – through their respective counsels – informed Quezon City Regional Trial Court Branch 221 Judge Jocelyn Solis-Reyes that they would directly appeal the decision to the appellate court.
Supreme Court Public Information Office/released

Andal Jr., Zaldy to take convictions to CA

Janvic Mateo (The Philippine Star) - January 4, 2020 - 12:00am

MANILA, Philippines — Maguindanao massacre convicts Andal Ampatuan Jr., his brother Zaldy and 19 others will directly appeal their multiple murder conviction before the Court of Appeals (CA).

Instead of filing a motion for reconsideration, the Ampatuan brothers – through their respective counsels – informed Quezon City Regional Trial Court Branch 221 Judge Jocelyn Solis-Reyes that they would directly appeal the decision to the appellate court.

They requested the court to transmit the entire records of the multiple murder case to the CA for further proceedings.

Nineteen other convicts have filed their respective notices of appeal to the Quezon City court.

They are Bahnarin Kamaong, Saudi Mokamad, Talembo Masukat, Theng Sali, Manny Ampatuan, Nasser Esmael, Tato Tampogao, Mohades Ampatuan, Mohamad Datumanong, Misuari Ampatuan, Taya Bangkulat, Salik Bangkulat, Thong Guiamano, Sonny Pindi, Armando Ambalgan, Kudza Masukat, Edres Kasan, Zacaria Akil and Samaon Andatuan.

Like the Ampatuans, the 19 other suspects who filed notices of appeal were convicted of 57 counts of murder and sentenced to up to 40 years in prison or reclusion perpetua.

Four other convicts – Anwar Ampatuan Sr., his sons Anwar Jr. and Anwar Sajid and Jonathan Engid – have filed motions for reconsideration, asking Solis-Reyes to reverse her decision for its supposedly wrongful appreciation of evidence during the decade-long trial.

Three others convicted of multiple murder have yet to file their respective motions for reconsideration or notices of appeal as of Friday afternoon: Abedin Alamada, Sukarno Dicay and Abusama Maguid.

Parties were given 15 days from promulgation, or until yesterday, to file pleadings in relation to the decision.

Several motions have also been filed with the court seeking some clarification on the 761-page decision promulgated on Dec. 19.

Kamaong, whose name appeared in both the list of convicted and acquitted suspects, filed a very urgent motion seeking for his immediate release.

His lawyer Juman Paa, however, also filed a notice of appeal on what they claimed as his erroneous conviction for the massacre.

Private prosecutor Nena Santos earlier said that Kamaong was convicted based on the body of the decision, a claim disputed by Paa in his motion.

Meanwhile, lawyer Amando Cura of the Public Attorney’s Office asked the court to clarify the judgment on suspects Abdulbayan Mundas and Rakim Amil, whose names did not appear in the dispositive portion of the ruling.

Cura said his clients firmly believe that they should have been included in the list of acquitted suspects.

The public attorney also filed a separate motion seeking clarification on convict Kudza Masukat, whose name was read both in the list of convicted and acquitted suspects during the promulgation.

The final copy of the decision uploaded by the Supreme Court showed that Masukat was convicted and was not among those acquitted from the massacre.

For her part, Santos asked the court to include the name of the heirs of victim Faridah Sabdullah in the dispositive portion of the ruling.

She noted that the P350,000 award for damages to the heirs of the victim was not included in the decision even if it was mentioned in the body of the ruling.

Several hearings have been set next week to tackle the different pleadings filed by parties in connection with the Dec. 19 decision.

ANDAL AMPATUAN JR. SAUDI MOKAMAD
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