US: China most flagrant UNCLOS violator
That bullying is alsoevident in the South China Sea,” US Secretary of State Michael Pompeo said during a press briefing. “The United States imposed sanctions and visa restrictions on Chinese individuals and entities responsible for the CCP (Chinese Communist Party)’s imperialism there, doing things such as unlawful energy surveillance, activities in the economic zones of our ally the Philippines and other countries.”
AFP
US: China most flagrant UNCLOS violator
Pia Lee-Brago (The Philippine Star) - September 7, 2020 - 12:00am

MANILA, Philippines — A United States official has accused China of being the most “flagrant” violator of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), with an “intensifying” bullying pattern evident in the South China Sea and unlawful energy surveillance and activities in the Philippines’ economic zone.

“That bullying is alsoevident in the South China Sea,” US Secretary of State Michael Pompeo said during a press briefing. “The United States imposed sanctions and visa restrictions on Chinese individuals and entities responsible for the CCP (Chinese Communist Party)’s imperialism there, doing things such as unlawful energy surveillance, activities in the economic zones of our ally the Philippines and other countries.”

In light of China’s maritime “lawlessness,” he said it is no surprise that Beijing’s candidate in the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea received more abstentions than any other candidate.

“China is the most flagrant violator of the Law of the Sea Convention, and nations all across the world are registering their disapproval,” Pompeo added.

The US urged all governments, parties and institutions around the world to assess the risk and reconsider business deals with the “predatory” Chinese state-owned enterprises including the company central to militarization and coercion in the South China Sea.

The State Department and Commerce Department said the blacklisting of Chinese companies and Pompeo’s announcement on the imposition of visa restrictions on Chinese individuals, including executives of state-owned enterprises responsible for Beijing’s reclamation, construction and militarization of disputed outposts and coercion of Southeast Asian claimants are in line with the new US policy on Chinese maritime claims in the South China Sea.

The Commerce Department announced that it added 24 of Beijing’s state-owned enterprises, including subsidiaries of the China Communications Construction Co. to the entity list for their role in these South China Sea activities.

Pompeo announced the imposition of visa restrictions on nationals, including executives of state-owned enterprises, responsible for Beijing’s reclamation, construction, or militarization of disputed outposts and coercion of Southeast Asian claimants.

Meanwhile, according to commander of the US Indo-Pacific Command Phil Davidson, an emboldened Communist Party of China seeks to change the world to one in which Chinese national power is more important than international law.

“Beijing is using a whole-of-party approach to coerce, corrupt and contest the rules-based international order,” he said at the 75th Commemoration of the End of World War II in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

The US, Davidson said, continues to defend the values of a free and open Indo-Pacific, to keep America, and its allies and partners free from tyranny, and to defend their shared values.

In a new report, the US Department of Defense said China plans to double its stockpile of nuclear warheads in the next decade, including those designed to be carried atop ballistic missiles that can reach the US.

In its annual “China Military Power” report to Congress, the Pentagon said the modernization and expansion of China’s nuclear forces is part of a broader effort by Beijing to develop a more assertive position on the world stage and to match or surpass America by 2049 as the dominant power in the Asia-Pacific region.

Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for China Chad Sbragia said the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) is “not intended to be merely a showpiece of Chinese modernity” but a tool of Chinese statecraft.

China defended its growing military power, saying it means growing strength for “world peace” after the release of the Pentagon’s latest report.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying said China’s strategic intentions are “transparent” and “consistent” but Beijing’s military power is “far behind” of the US.

“The development of China’s military power means growing strength for world peace,” Hua said in a press conference in Beijing.

“China’s strengthening of national defense is to safeguard national independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity, and is exercising the legitimate rights and interests of a sovereign state, which is beyond reproach,” she said.

She explained that the Constitution of China clearly stipulates that China adheres to the path of peaceful development and promotes the building of a community with a shared future for mankind.

Hua said China, which has also pursued a national defense policy that is defensive in nature, is a “builder of world peace, a contributor to global development and a defender of international order.”

“As we all know, China’s military power is far behind that of the US. The United States spends as much on its military as nearly the next 10 countries combined,” Hua said.

Highlight on peace, freedom

Speaking before audiences in Manila and Baguio City, simultaneously linked together as one event via Zoom, Foreign Affairs Secretary Teodoro Locsin Jr. highlighted the peace and freedom that the Philippines gained and used to rebuild and secure its future out of the ashes of the Second World War 75 years ago.

Locsin joined Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana, US Ambassador Sung Kim and Japanese Ambassador Koji Haneda in reflecting on the end of the bloodiest war in history and the value of having strong allies, partners and friends among nations, especially at this time when the entire world struggles with a pandemic.

Special guests at the in-person but socially distanced event, hosted by Deputy Chief of Mission John Law in the chancery of the US embassy, included Manila Mayor Francisco Domagoso and Foreign Affairs Assistant Secretary Maria Lumen Isleta.

The program also saw a presentation by professor Charita delos Reyes on the history and significance of Baguio City as the place where World War II in the Philippines began and ended, with the signing of surrender documents by General Tomoyuki Yamashita at Camp John Hay on Sept. 3, 1945, and a virtual walk-through of the war photos exhibited at Fort Santiago in Intramuros, Manila.

Locsin stressed that the peace that ensued after the war has been crucial to the Philippines’ present and future.

“That future of peace and freedom is our present; and we guard it fiercely and without compromise; so that we and those who come after us shall ever live with the fullest reality and the most certain promise of peace and harmony without end,” Locsin said.

For his part, Kim said “Today, we find ourselves facing an entirely new and unprecedented set of challenges to our people, our economies, and our nations.”

In the global battle against the COVID-19 pandemic, he pointed out that the long-standing partnership is enabling the strong US-Philippines cooperation on display.

“From our soldiers and the vast network of support personnel serving together on the battlefield in 1945, to our scientists and public health experts collaborating today, the US-Philippines relationship continues to evolve to meet whatever challenges that come our way,” Kim said.

“Time and time again, history has demonstrated that the United States, Philippines and Japan are strongest when we work together as friends, partners and allies,” he said.

CCP
Philstar
  • Latest
  • Trending
Latest
Are you sure you want to log out?
X
Login

Philstar.com is one of the most vibrant, opinionated, discerning communities of readers on cyberspace. With your meaningful insights, help shape the stories that can shape the country. Sign up now!

FORGOT PASSWORD?
SIGN IN
or sign in with