^

Philippines to experience longer nights after Sept. 23

Rosette Adel (Philstar.com) - September 9, 2015 - 4:17am

MANILA, Philippines – The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) on Wednesday announced that there will be longer nights after the autumnal equinox on September 23.

PAGASA said the country will experience longer nights as the sun moves below the celestial equator toward the southern hemisphere after the autumnal equinox at 4:20 p.m., September 23.

The state weather bureau explained that the autumnal equinox is when the day and night will have equal length with 12 hours all over the world.

PAGASA Astronomical Observation and Time Unit Chief Mario Raymundo explained that the autumnal equinox exposes the countries below the equator or in the southern hemisphere to more sun and those above it to less sun.

“After ng September 23 ay dahan-dahan ng hahaba ang gabi sa Pilipinas na nasa northern hemisphere. Ibig sabihin ay mas maaga ng lulubog ang araw,” Raymundo said.

Raymundo said that the longer nights in the northern hemisphere will prevail until December.

“Pagdating ng December, mga around 5:30 p.m. pa lang ay lulubog na ang araw,” Raymundo said.

Raymundo said the autumnal equinox signifies the approach of winter in the northern hemisphere and summer in the southern hemisphere.

Aside from longer nights, PAGASA weather forecaster Robert Badrina said the country will also start experiencing cold weather as the southwest monsoon shift to the cold-weather-associated northeast monsoon or “hanging amihan” beginning next month.

The northeast monsoon is the cold wind from China and Siberia that blows into the country from late October until mid-February, often associated with Christmas season.

The transition of weather occurs twice a year, in March and in September where the astronomical event is called vernal equinox and autumnal equinox, respectively.

Meanwhile, Raymundo also reported that a super moon or the perigee moon, is expected to happen on September 28.

The super moon is the phenomenon when the full moon is closest to the earth during its yearly orbit. The moon’s normal average distance from the Earth is about 384,400 kilometers.

Raymundo noted that the anticipated super moon is the most visible and closest to the Earth among the super moon events this year as it will appear about 14 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter.

PAGASA said that the moon will be nearest to the Earth at 356,877 kilometers at 9:46 a.m., September 28.

ACIRC ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATION AND TIME UNIT CHIEF MARIO RAYMUNDO AUTUMNAL CHINA AND SIBERIA EQUINOX GEOPHYSICAL AND ASTRONOMICAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION HEMISPHERE MOON PHILIPPINE ATMOSPHERIC RAYMUNDO ROBERT BADRINA
Philstar
  • Latest
  • Trending
Latest
Are you sure you want to log out?
X
Login

Philstar.com is one of the most vibrant, opinionated, discerning communities of readers on cyberspace. With your meaningful insights, help shape the stories that can shape the country. Sign up now!

FORGOT PASSWORD?
SIGN IN
or sign in with