The International Labor Organization (ILO)’s report titled “Safety and health at the heart of the future of work: Building on 100 years of experience” identified new and existing occupational risks that affect women more than men.
Michael Varcas
Stress, overtime, disease lead to workers’ deaths yearly
Pia Lee-Brago (The Philippine Star) - April 23, 2019 - 12:00am

MANILA, Philippines — Stress, overtime and illness contribute to the deaths of nearly 2.8 million workers per year while an additional 374 million people get injured or fall ill because of their jobs, according to a report of the United Nations’ labor agency.

The International Labor Organization (ILO)’s report titled “Safety and health at the heart of the future of work: Building on 100 years of experience” identified new and existing occupational risks that affect women more than men. 

The report on Occupational Safety and Health was published ahead of the World Day for Safety and Health at Work on April 28.

The report said changes in working practices, demographics, technology and the environment are creating new occupational safety and health concerns.

Growing challenges include psychosocial risks, work-related stress and non-communicable diseases, notably circulatory and respiratory diseases as well as cancers. 

“No work should threaten your wellbeing, your safety or your life,” the ILO report said.

The report highlighted four major transformative forces driving changes: technology, demographic shifts, development and climate change as well as changes in the organization of work.

Technology such as digitization, robotics and nanotechology can affect psychosocial health and introduce new materials with unmeasured health hazards.

Demographic shifts are important because young workers have high occupational injury rates while older workers need adaptive practices and equipment to work safely.

 Women, who are entering the workforce in increasing numbers, are more likely to have non-standard work arrangements and have a higher risk of musculoskeletal disorders.

Development and climate change pose risks such as air pollution, heat stress, emerging diseases, shifting weather and temperature patterns that can bring job losses.

According to the report, new jobs will be created through sustainable development and the green economy.

Changes in the organization of work can bring flexibility that allows more people to enter the labor force, but may also lead to psychosocial issues such as insecurity, compromised privacy and rest time and excessive work hours.

The report said approximately 36 percent of the world’s labor force are working more than 48 hours per week.

INTERNATIONAL LABOR ORGANIZATION
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