^
+ Follow ARBITRAL Tag
ARBITRAL
Array
(
    [results] => Array
        (
            [0] => Array
                (
                    [ArticleID] => 1388225
                    [Title] => Phl hosts talks on judicial, arbitral decisions between states
                    [Summary] => 

The Philippines hosted a discussion on the enforcement of judicial and arbitral decisions between states on the sidelines of the International Law Week in the United Nations.

[DatePublished] => 2014-11-05 00:00:00 [ColumnID] => 0 [Focus] => 0 [AuthorID] => 1804865 [AuthorName] => Pia Lee-Brago [SectionName] => Headlines [SectionUrl] => headlines [URL] => ) [1] => Array ( [ArticleID] => 900879 [Title] => Q&A: Why Phl challenged China’s sea claim [Summary] =>

(The Department of Foreign Affairs issued the following primer on the government’s recent move to seek arbitral proceedings against China’s claim over Philippine-held territories, including Panatag Shoal off Zambales).

[DatePublished] => 2013-01-25 00:00:00 [ColumnID] => 0 [Focus] => 0 [AuthorID] => [AuthorName] => [SectionName] => Headlines [SectionUrl] => headlines [URL] => http://imageshack.us/a/img152/5120/gen6thumb.jpg ) [2] => Array ( [ArticleID] => 271310 [Title] => Arbitrators in Paris [Summary] => A controversial aspect of the problem of multiple or parallel arbitral proceedings brought up during the 24th Annual Meeting of the ICC Institute in Paris, France on 15 November 2004 was the application of principles of civil law by way of solution. Commercial arbitration generally involves common law principles of good faith and equity. Hence, the decisions of arbitrators (whether sole or tribunal) are more according to general standards of substantive fairness and reasonableness rather than technical rules of evidence or procedure. [DatePublished] => 2005-03-22 00:00:00 [ColumnID] => 135291 [Focus] => 0 [AuthorID] => 1657126 [AuthorName] => POINT OF LAW By Teresita J. Herbosa [SectionName] => Business [SectionUrl] => business [URL] => ) [3] => Array ( [ArticleID] => 196759 [Title] => Is the autonomy principle in arbitration law an iron-clad rule? [Summary] => In my article published in the Jan. 7, 2003 issue of this paper, I discussed the autonomy principle in arbitration law. Under this principle, an arbitral clause contained in a contract is considered separate and distinct from the main contract. Simply stated, the alleged invalidity of the contract does not adversely affect the arbitral clause such that the contracting parties must still be made to submit the validity of the contract to arbitration. [DatePublished] => 2003-02-25 00:00:00 [ColumnID] => 133241 [Focus] => 0 [AuthorID] => 1325546 [AuthorName] => Francis Lim [SectionName] => Business [SectionUrl] => business [URL] => ) [4] => Array ( [ArticleID] => 190644 [Title] => What is the Autonomy Principle in Arbitration Law? [Summary] => Arbitration is fast gaining acceptance as a means of settling contractual disputes. This is especially true in international commercial transactions where there is some mistrust in the judicial systems of the countries to which the contracting parties are nationals. The parties often choose arbitration as a neutral forum to decide disputes between them. [DatePublished] => 2003-01-07 00:00:00 [ColumnID] => 133241 [Focus] => 0 [AuthorID] => 1325546 [AuthorName] => Francis Lim [SectionName] => Business [SectionUrl] => business [URL] => ) ) )
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