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Record overseas voting turnouts also logged in Cambodia, Dubai, Hawaii

Kaycee Valmonte - Philstar.com
Record overseas voting turnouts also logged in Cambodia, Dubai, Hawaii
In Cambodia, the Philippine Embassy in Phnom Penh said a “record-breaking” 1,949 Filipinos based there cast their ballots.
Philippine Embassy in Phnom Penh, Cambodia

MANILA, Philippines — More Filipinos abroad exercised their right to vote during the month-long overseas voting period, foreign service posts reported.

A record voting turnout was recorded in Cambodia, the United Arab Emirates, as well as in Hawaii and in American Samoa. Philippine posts in San Francisco and Canada also reported a significant increase in voters participating in this year’s polls.

Over 1.697 million registered Filipino voters across the globe had the opportunity to cast their votes from April 10 to May 9.

While the Commission on Elections has yet to finish all the certificates of canvass (COCs) from overseas posts turning in manual COCs, Comelec Commissioner Marlon Casquejo said last week that the poll body has so far logged a 34.24% voting turnout and the Comelec is expecting it to reach up to 37%.

The high turnout comes even as issues of late deliveries of mail-in ballots, among others, and calls for an extension of the voting period were shunned by the poll body.

Turnout in Cambodia reaches 65.03%

In Cambodia, the Philippine Embassy in Phnom Penh said a “record-breaking” 1,949 Filipinos based there cast their ballots. Voting was done in-person using a manual ballot. 

"This represents 65.03% of the total 2,997 registered Filipino voters in Cambodia," the embassy said

The embassy also conducted field voting missions in Sihanoukville on April 23 to 24 and in Siem Reap on April 30 to May 1. These were done "to encourage more voters to exercise their right to vote."

It added that the four special board of election inspectors completed counting the votes at 2 p.m. on May 10, while the canvassing was finished at 5:30 p.m. on the same day with accredited poll watchers.

Record high 35% for Hawaii, American Samoa

In the United States, the Philippine Consulate General in Honolulu said 2,993 out of the 8,450 registered voters under its jurisdiction of Hawaii and American Samoa cast their ballots during the month-long voting period. This translates to a “record high” 35% turnout. 

Voting there was done by mail through an automated election system. Polls were closed and final counting of the votes began at 1 a.m. on May 9, in sync with the closing of precincts back home. 

By 11 a.m. on May 9, the counting of votes and the electronic transmission of election returns at the consulate was completed.

Dubai logs 31.49% voter turnout

In the Middle East, the Philippine Consulate General in Dubai reported its highest overseas voting turnout since overseas Filipinos were allowed to vote in 2004. Voting in Dubai is done in person at the consulate and at the Philippine Overseas Labor Office using the automated election system.

The foreign service post said it booked a 31.49% turnout after 60,393 registered Filipino voters participated in the latest elections from the 191,779 total registered voters. Election proceedings, which included the counting of votes, there reportedly finished by May 11.

"This record turnout is a testament to the keenness of overseas Filipinos in Dubai and Northern Emirates to participate in the democratic process of elections in the Philippines, and make their voice heard in choosing which path our country should take in the next six years," Philippine Consul General in Dubai Renato Dueñas Jr. said

The turnout this year eclipses the 30.8% seen during the 2016 presidential elections, where 37,950 Filipinos cast their ballots out of the 122,953 registered voters.
 

2022 ELECTIONS

COMMISSION ON ELECTIONS

OVERSEAS FILIPINOS

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