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Global coronavirus infections pass 15 million
Cars line up for COVID-19 tests at a walk-in and drive-through coronavirus testing site in Miami Beach, Florida on July 22, 2020. The United States on July 21 recorded 68,524 new coronavirus cases in the previous 24 hours, Johns Hopkins University reported in its real-time tally. The United States has seen a resurgence of cases, particularly in the so-called Sun Belt, stretching across the south from Florida to California.
AFP/CHANDAN KHANNA

Global coronavirus infections pass 15 million

Sebastian Smith (Agence France-Presse) - July 23, 2020 - 7:31am

WASHINGTON, United States — The number of coronavirus infections around the world passed 15 million on Wednesday with more than a quarter of those cases in the United States, where President Donald Trump warned that the pandemic was likely to get worse before it gets better.

The US data makes grim reading with more than 140,000 fatalities and regular daily death tolls of more than 1,000, yet Trump repeated his claim late on Tuesday that the pandemic would somehow "disappear".

Trump has been a critic of lockdown measures and has argued in favour of reopening the economy even as death tolls have climbed.

Signs are emerging in other parts of the world that the virus quickly springs back when lockdown measures are lifted.

Australia, Belgium, Hong Kong and Japanese capital Tokyo had all used restrictive measures to successfully beat outbreaks earlier in the pandemic, but all are now facing an upsurge in cases.

Australia and Hong Kong set new daily records for confirmed cases on Wednesday and Tokyo's governor urged residents to stay at home during a forthcoming holiday as cases climb. 

Belgian officials said people must stick to social-distancing guidelines to halt a "snowball effect before it provokes a new avalanche".

However, one of the more controversial measures taken by any government -- South Africa's decision to ban the sale of alcohol and enforce a curfew -- continued to cause anguish.

"What the government has put in place has been knee-capping," restaurateur Sean Barber said during a protest in Johannesburg. "It's decimating our industry."

Vaccine hopes

The crisis has left tens of millions unemployed around the world and crippled global commerce, prompting the European Union to agree an unprecedented 750 billion euro ($858 billion) aid package for the hardest-hit member countries earlier this week.

But the airline industry continues to struggle under the weight of travel restrictions and reluctance among potential passengers to fly.

Irish carrier Ryanair said on Wednesday it would shut its base near the German business hub Frankfurt after pilots refused to take a pay cut.

The firm, which is looking to shed 3,000 staff in total, said the pilot's union had "voted for job cuts and base closures when they could have preserved all jobs".

The production of a vaccine is now key to ensuring a return to something close to normality for businesses and the general public. 

More than 200 candidate drugs are being developed with 23 having progressed to clinical trials.

The US government has agreed to pay almost $2 billion for 100 million doses of a potential vaccine being developed by German firm BioNTech and US giant Pfizer.

Another leading candidate, developed in part by pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca, registered promising results from clinical trials this week. 

But the firm's chief said on Tuesday a global rollout was not imminent.

"We hope to be able to produce a vaccine by the end of the year... perhaps a little earlier if all goes well," said Pascal Soriot.

'Bake a giant cake'

With the sporting world just about getting back on its feet, Olympic officials conceded on Wednesday that their hopes of holding the Tokyo 2020 Games next year rested on a vaccine.

"If things continue as they are now, we couldn't" hold the Games, said local organising committee president Yoshiro Mori.

While global efforts to prevent new infections are the principal concern of policymakers, the extent and severity of the disease in countries with struggling health systems has becoming clearer in recent days.

India passed the one-million infections milestone last week and is now behind only the US and Brazil, but new data on Wednesday suggested a vast underestimate.

A study showed almost a quarter of the population in New Delhi had contracted the virus, equating to roughly five million infections in the capital city.

Officials have registered just 125,000 cases.

Meanwhile, for those who recover from the disease, the path back to full health is not always straightforward.

In Brazil, 63-year-old Elenice da Silva had a severe infection that lasted nearly three months.

The illness left her temporarily unable to speak.

"Intensive care was awful. But now I'm feeling marvellous," she told AFP during her recovery. "I'm going to bake a giant cake for everyone."

DONALD TRUMP NOVEL CORONAVIRUS
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LATEST UPDATE: May 13, 2021 - 3:30pm

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May 13, 2021 - 3:30pm

At the peak of Kenya's third wave of COVID-19 in March, hospitals — buckling under the strain of the virus — saw their oxygen reserves fizzle out. 

Since then, they have been scrambling to increase capacity of the lifesaving element, fearing the nightmare scenario currently unfolding in India due to oxygen shortages.

On the roof of the Metropolitan Hospital, a 150-bed private institution that targets the middle class, a brand-new oxygen production unit has just been installed that is capable of producing up to 600 liters of the gas per minute.

Metropolitan CEO Kanyenje Gakombe said the hospital accelerated plans to produce its own oxygen after supplies were squeezed to the limit during the height of the third wave, fanned by the variants of the coronavirus first detected in Britain and South Africa.

In April Kenya registered a record 571 deaths, and the health ministry warned hospitals were overrun with fewer than 300 patients in the Intensive Care Unit and fewer than 2,000 hospitalised countrywide. — AFP

May 12, 2021 - 6:19pm

The catastrophic scale of the Covid-19 pandemic could have been prevented had the warning signs been heeded, the global panel investigating the world's coronavirus response concluded Wednesday.

The Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response blamed a "toxic cocktail" of dithering and poor coordination, said the World Health Organization could have sounded the alarm sooner, and urged rich countries to donate one billion vaccine doses by September, in its long-awaited final report. —  AFP

May 12, 2021 - 12:36pm

Official data show India's coronavirus death toll surpassed 250,000 on Wednesday as the pandemic raged across the vast country of 1.3 billion people.

According to the health ministry, 4,205 people died in the past 24 hours -- a new record -- taking total fatalities to 254,197. 

The number of cases rose almost 350,000 to 23.3 million, the second-highest after the United States. — AFP

May 12, 2021 - 9:03am

The World Health Organization said Wednesday that a variant of COVID-19 behind the acceleration of India's explosive outbreak has been found in dozens of countries all over the world.

The UN health agency said the B.1.617 variant of COVID-19, first found in India in October, had been detected in sequences uploaded to the GISAID open-access database "from 44 countries in all six WHO regions," adding it had received "reports of detections from five additional countries".  — AFP

May 11, 2021 - 6:49pm

Taiwan bans large gatherings after a cluster of local infections prompted authorities to raise the coronavirus alert level in a place with one of the world's best pandemic responses.

The self-ruled island has been hailed as a global leader in containing the COVID-19 pandemic with just 1,210 confirmed cases, 12 deaths and minimal social distancing needed once the initial outbreak was quelled.

Last year ,Taiwan recorded 253 straight days without any local infections. — AFP

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