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The final battle between the American blue and red

WHAT MATTERS MOST - Atty. Josephus Jimenez (The Freeman) - November 2, 2020 - 12:00am

When I was still in the corporate world, whenever we talked of the war between red and blue, we always referred to the raging competition between Coke and Pepsi. Red is the official color of Coca-Cola all over the world. Blue is the color of Pepsi. The global headquarters of Coke International is in Atlanta, Georgia, while New York is the global home of Pepsi International. In a way, it is also a war between the north and the south.

But in US politics, blue represents the Democratic Party, and red is the official color of the GOP or the Republican Party. The famous Democrats are presidents John F. Kenny, Lyndon B. Johnson, Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, and hopefully, incoming president Joe Biden. The more well-known Republicans include presidents Dwight Eisenhower, Ronald Reagan, Richard Nixon, George Henry Walker Bush (the father), and George W. Bush (the son). Tomorrow's US presidential polls will finally decide the outcome of the opposing campaigns between Democrats' Joe Biden and GOP's Donald Trump. My bold prediction is that Biden will win.

The blue states like California, New York, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Washington, and others will deliver the votes for the Democrats. Republicans rely on Texas, and, hopefully for them, Florida. Let us look at the historical trends. California has always voted Democrats in the last seven presidential polls. In 1992, Bill Clinton won over George HW Bush (the father) in California, by a ratio of 46% for the Democrats and 33 and for GOP. In 1996, Clinton was reelected with even a higher 51% over GOP challenger Dole, 38% in that biggest US state. In 2000, Al Gore got 53% of the Californian votes winning over George W. Bush (the son) who got only 38%. In 2004, Kerry won 55% of the votes in California to George Bush's 44%. Nationally, however, both Gore and Kerry were defeated by Bush in the Electoral College.

Also in California, in 2008 Obama defeated McCain by a ratio of 61 to 37%. In 2012, Obama won over Romney with a ratio of 59% to 38%. And in 2016, Hillary Clinton won 61% of the California votes over Trump's measly 34%. There are more than a million Fil-Ams in California. New York is the bluest state of all, where Biden is expected to win 61% of tomorrow's polls, with Trump getting only 29%, despite the fact that the incumbent was born and raised here. In Massachusetts, the home of the Kennedys, Biden is expected to win a whopping 69% of the votes, with Trump not sure to get even 31%. In Illinois, the home base of former president Barack Obama, Biden is poised to garner 53% to Trump's 40%. The northwestern state of Washington will deliver 58% of their votes for Biden and 36% to Trump.

Hawaii, the home of many Filipinos, mostly Ilocanos and Visayans, will deliver 61% of their votes to Joe Biden and only a small 28% for the incumbent Trump. Hawaii is also the place where Obama was born and raised after his Kenyan father left his American mom. Trump is expected to win in Texas and is spending a lot of money, hoping to win in Florida. Trump also expects to win in the smaller states of Alabama, Alaska, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, and the two Dakotas. But Biden will win in Wisconsin, Virginia, Vermont, Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Oregon, New Mexico, Nevada, Maryland, Maine, Minnesota, and Delaware.

I have no serious doubt that November and December are the last two months of President Donald Trump in the White House. From Hawaii to Maine, from Washington to New Mexico, Biden is the likely winner. Trump will be better off going to his casinos, and his Miss Universe franchise. The US nation deserves Joe Biden and Kamala Harris. The blue is going to trounce the red.

COKE PEPSI
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