Most expensive city list: Manila up 29 spots
Louella Desiderio (The Philippine Star) - June 27, 2019 - 12:00am

MANILA, Philippines — The cost of living for expatriate workers in Manila is getting more expensive, according to the latest survey of global consultancy Mercer.

Based on Mercer’s 2019 Cost of Living Study, the Philippine capital ranked 109th out of 210 cities, up 29 spots from its 138th position last year.

Mercer said the increase in Manila’s ranking was the fourth sharpest climb in the world.

Ashqabat in Turkmenistan saw the biggest increase in cost of living as its ranking moved up 36 places to reach the seventh spot.

It was followed by Phnom Penh in Cambodia, which rose 34 spots to its current 108th rank, and Havana in Cuba, which climbed 32 places to rank 133rd.

Compared to other cities in Southeast Asia, Manila is more expensive than Hanoi (112th), Yangon (117th), Ho Chi Minh (120th) and Kuala Lumpur (141st).

Manila is more affordable to live in compared to Singapore (third), Bangkok (40th), Bandar Seri Begawan (102nd), Jakarta (105th) and Phnom Penh (108th).

Mercer’s March 2019 survey ranked Hong Kong as the most expensive city for expats, followed by Tokyo and Singapore.

South Korea’s capital Seoul placed fourth. Zurich in Switzerland came in fifth.

Tunis in Tunisia was the least expensive city for foreign workers as it placed 209th.

Other cities at the bottom of the list are Tashkent in Uzbekistan (208th), Karachi in Pakistan (207th), Bishkek in Kyrgyzstan (206th), as well as Banjul in Gambia, and Windhoek in Namibia (tied at 204th).

Over 500 cities worldwide were included in the cost of living survey, which aims to help multinational companies and governments determine compensation for their expatriates. –  Mayen Jaymalin

MERCER’S 2019 COST OF LIVING STUDY
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