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Freeman Cebu Lifestyle

Atopic dermatitis

SKIN REPUBLIC - Jennifer Toledo-Tan M.D. - The Freeman

Jennifer Toledo TAN, MD.

Dear Dr. Jen,

I have atopic dermatitis.  My skin is really dry and is itchy whenever subjected to dust and sweat.  I have had this skin condition way back when I was young, around four years old.  Now I am already 24.  I have scars all over my body.  I want to get rid of these to boost my confidence.  Also, I would want to wear sleeveless and shorts.  What treatments should I undergo?

Kit

Dear Kit,

Atopic dermatitis or eczema can persist from childhood up to the later years.  It's mostly inherited genetically and is usually aggravated by sweat, dust, stress, hot temperature and illness.  Skin can be very dry, irritable and extremely itchy.  This may cause you to uncontrollably scratch, causing further injury to your skin.  While most scars are definitely treatable, it also depends what kind of scars are present on your skin.

The most common and easiest scars to treat are the dark scars.  Gentle chemical peels along with take-home bleaching creams can remedy dark scars.  However, take caution and to not over-hurry the process.  You want your skin to go back to its normal color, gently, safely and properly.  Seven-day miracle creams are either too strong for you or is plain hogwash. The worse thing you can do is cause irritation by using agents that are too strong.

White scars from using steroids can also be treated with some melanin-growth stimulating creams.  Select strong peels and laser may also be used to improve collagen growth and encourage new skin to grow.  The same also holds true for rough, uneven scars.  Peels and laser can be utilized to achieve smooth, even-toned skin.

Dear Dr. Jen,

I had to clean up the weeds from our garden three days ago.  I noticed I developed very, very itchy rashes on my cheeks, neck, arms and hands.  Is it possible to be allergic to plants?

Jason

Dear Jason,

It is definitely possible to be allergic to plants.  This is called phytodermatitis.  In some cases, the juices of plants along with solar exposure produce an even much worse contact dermatitis.

The distribution in plant-induced contact dermatitis is very obvious.  It is usually along the exposed areas or where the plants came in contact with your skin. Cloth gloves or too loose rubber gloves offer no protection against the plants. 

Treatment is fairly simple.  This includes application of mild steroid lotions twice a day for a week or two only.  If skin is already infected and irritated from the itching, antibiotics and antihistamines may be necessary.  You can get yourself checked by your nearest PDS dermatologist. Observe necessary precaution during your next gardening schedule.  Using protective gear that fits well and not touching your face and neck during gardening is important. 

Dr. Tan is a diplomate of Philippine Dermatological Society (PDS) and is affiliated with Perpetual Succour Hospital (PSH). For information on PDS, check http://www.pds.org.ph/. For questions or concerns, please text to: 0932 857 7070; or email to: [email protected]; or call The Freeman: (032) 2531276, or PSH: (032) 233 8620 and 232 5929. Your inquiries will be forwarded to Dr. Tan.

 

 

DEAR JASON

DEAR KIT

DR. JEN

DR. TAN

JENNIFER TOLEDO

NBSP

NOW I

PERPETUAL SUCCOUR HOSPITAL

PHILIPPINE DERMATOLOGICAL SOCIETY

SCARS

SKIN

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