EO 156
YOUR SUNDAY DRIVER - Lord Seno (The Freeman) - February 3, 2013 - 12:00am

  There was a time before the year 2002 when Secondhand Japanese (surplus) cars began storming the Philippine Market. Although the public was warned of the bad quality in which these were converted (Righthand Drive to Lefthand Drive), many were attracted to its low price.  Yet to those who were learned enough to “fine-tune” these units properly were given more than what was a give-away from the start. Our Toyota Prado Landcruiser is living proof of this. This vehicle has served us efficiently for more than a decade now, with hardly more than the regular maintenance costs. Considering the rough mountain roads it has traversed while carrying a heavy load of produce, it certainly has proven to be a workhorse deserving a medal of service. The big wonder is still the unbelievable low price it cost us. 

    This brings me to the newly stamped law that prohibits the importation of these units.  Are we then supposed to lament the ban on the importation of second hand cars which the Supreme Court finally approved, ending years of courtroom drama over Executive Order 156 issued on December 12, 2002 by then president Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo?

    To “accelerate the sound development of the motor vehicle industry in the Philippines”, EO 156 prohibits the importation of all types of used motor vehicles, parts, and components. EO 156 was declared legal and constitutional by the high court and by a written statement by Senior Associate Justice Antonio Carpio.  The tribunal further stated that the order was “a valid police power measure addressing an urgent national concern.”

    Exemptions to the order are brand new vehicles of current year model that has a mileage of less than 200km; vehicles owned by a returning resident or immigrant which cannot be sold for at least three years; a vehicle for the use of an official of the Diplomatic Corps; trucks (except pick-up trucks), buses, and special purpose vehicles.

    The Supreme Court decision makes permanent the restraining order it issued against the Court of Appeals on January 16, 2012 for granting injunction relief for EO 156. The decision is seen as a major victory for the formal automotive industry which claims to employ over 77,000 workers.

    I have seen a number of awfully, if not frightfully converted cars since the onset of its importation in the late 90’s. This is mediocrity at its finest coupled with the Importer’s desire to make a quick buck.  It has given this striving industry a bad reputation.   This is partially why I am for this law, except for the provisions of banning the importation of used parts and components.

    A big part of the transport industry, especially the Public Transport Sector, depends on the used market for affordable, enduring parts.  We are assumably the only country who has an act against the importation of used parts.

Although used, I’d fancy these over those costly Chinese knock-off replacements. (Source: Autoindustriya.com)

COURT OF APPEALS DIPLOMATIC CORPS EXECUTIVE ORDER GLORIA MACAPAGAL-ARROYO OUR TOYOTA PRADO LANDCRUISER PHILIPPINE MARKET PUBLIC TRANSPORT SECTOR SECONDHAND JAPANESE SUPREME COURT
  • Latest
Latest
Latest
Are you sure you want to log out?
X
Login

Philstar.com is one of the most vibrant, opinionated, discerning communities of readers on cyberspace. With your meaningful insights, help shape the stories that can shape the country. Sign up now!

SIGN IN
or sign in with