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Health And Family

Russia says Sputnik gives longer protection than Western jabs

Agence France-Presse
Russia says Sputnik gives longer protection than Western jabs
Healthcare workers administer doses of Russia's Sputnik V Covid-19 vaccine to patients at a vaccination centre in the GUM State Department store in Moscow on October 21, 2021. Moscow will shut non-essential services between October 28 and November 7, its mayor said Thursday, as coronavirus deaths soar and vaccination rates stall in Russia, the country in Europe hardest hit by the pandemic. Mayor Sergei Sobyanin announced the 11-day closure a day after President Vladimir Putin ordered a nationwide paid week off at the end of the month to curb fast spreading infections.
AFP/Dimitar DILKOFF

MOSCOW, Russia — The backers of Sputnik V on Wednesday said the Russian vaccine provides longer immunity against coronavirus than Western jabs using messenger RNA (mRNA) technology.

The Russian Direct Investment Fund (RDIF), which supported the vaccine's development, said the Sputnik vaccine is 80 percent effective against coronavirus between six and eight months after the second dose.

The country has recorded more than 9.4 million coronavirus cases, the fifth-highest number in the world, and more than 267,000 virus-related deaths, according to government figures.

"Sputnik V efficacy is significantly higher than for Pfizer after six to eight months," RDIF head Kirill Dmitriev told reporters.

No independent study has confirmed the claim.

The fund said its data was based on the number of coronavirus infections in San Marino in November. 

More than 70 percent of the adult population in San Marino, a tiny republic surrounded by Italy, have been vaccinated with Sputnik.

"Efficacy was calculated based on data obtained from over 18,600 individuals fully vaccinated with Sputnik V not less than five months before November," the RDIF said.

The Sputnik team attributed the success of its vaccine to a "longer antibody and T-cell response", referring to the blood components that form part of the human immune system.

Dmitriev said the long-term effectiveness of vaccines was "the key to solve the pandemic".

Denis Logunov, deputy director at the state-run Gamaleya Center that developed Sputnik, said the health ministry was to register the vaccine for adolescents aged 12-17.

Independent experts have accused the authorities of downplaying the severity of the epidemic.

President Vladimir Putin earlier on Wednesday made a new appeal to sceptical Russians to vaccinate themselves but remained opposed to mandatory vaccinations.

Despite his repeated pleas, only around 37 percent of Russians are fully vaccinated. The country has in recent weeks seen more than 1,000 Covid deaths a day. 

COVID-19 VACCINES

RUSSIA

SPUTNIK-V

As It Happens
LATEST UPDATE: June 16, 2022 - 8:48am

Pharma giants Sanofi and GSK said on July 29, 2020, that they have agreed to supply Britain with up to 60 million doses of a potential COVID-19 vaccine. The agreement covers a vaccine candidate developed by France's Sanofi in partnership with the UK's GSK and is subject to a "final contract."

This thread collects some of the major developments in the search for a vaccine to ease the new coronavirus pandemic. (Main photo by AFP/Joel Saget)

June 16, 2022 - 8:48am

A panel of experts convened by the US Food and Drug Administration unanimously recommends Covid-19 vaccines  for children under five, the final age group awaiting immunization in most countries.

Formal authorizations should follow soon, with the first shots in arms expected early next week, just over a year-and-a-half after the first Covid vaccines were greenlighted for the elderly in December 2020.

"This recommendation does fill a significant unmet need for a really ignored younger population," says Michael Nelson, a professor of medicine at the University of Virginia, one of the 21 experts asked to vote for the milestone meeting. — AFP

June 15, 2022 - 9:24am

A panel of US medical experts recommends the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine for use in children aged six through 17.

Formal authorization should soon follow, at which point families will have a second option against the coronavirus, as Pfizer's vaccine was given the greenlight for teens and younger children last year.

After weighing available data, 22 experts convened by the US Food and Drug Administration unanimously agreed that the known benefits outweighed the known risks when Moderna's vaccine was administered as two shots at the adult dose of 100 micrograms to those aged 12-17, and half of that for children 6-11. — AFP

June 8, 2022 - 10:16am

A panel of experts convened by the US drug regulator recommends the Novavax COVID-19 shot, a late runner in the fight against the virus that could nonetheless play a role in overcoming vaccine hesitancy.

Three vaccines are currently approved in the United States: Pfizer and Moderna, which are based on messenger RNA, and Johnson and Johnson, which recently received a recommendation against broad use becase of links to a serious form of clotting.

Experts voted 21 in favor of the Novavax vaccine, with none against, and one abstention, despite some concerns it may be linked to rare cases of heart inflammation. — AFP

June 4, 2022 - 6:04pm

The Food and Drug Administration voices concern about myocarditis being potentially linked to the Novavax COVID-19 vaccine, just as experts are to weigh its use in the United States. 

The Novavax vaccine is already authorized in other countries, particularly in Europe. In the United States, an independent committee convened at the request of the FDA is to meet Tuesday to evaluate data from the clinical trials of Novavax and give its recommendation. 

In advance of that, the agency published a lengthy document on Friday analyzing these results, as it had done for the three other vaccines already authorized in the country. — AFP

April 14, 2022 - 9:19am

The head of US pharmaceutical giant Pfizer says a COVID-19 vaccine effective against multiple variants is possible before the end of 2022.

Chairman Albert Bourla says the firm was also working on producing a vaccine that could provide good protection for a whole year, meaning people would come back annually for boosters, as with influenza shots.

"I hope, clearly by autumn... that we could have a vaccine" that worked against not only the dominant Omicron but all known variants, he says. — AFP 

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